Hammering Out Hope

Our design destinations take us all over the world, but this was one journey that inspired us down to our core. We couldn’t help but share this incredible story that began a little over two years ago in Kathmandu and took structure in the Himalayan Hope Home.

It was late summer 2012 when we heard of the project. Create a safe haven—a simple home—for orphaned girls.

During a trip to Nepal, our chairman and CEO John Reed met with Karma Sherpa, president of The Small World. When he returned to the states, John shared the challenge and mission of the organization with us and between the 200-plus employees at our headquarters in Cleveland and the more than 600 across the country, we raised a little more than $26,000 in just 45 days.

With a corporate match, that number doubled and by the first of the New Year [2013], construction was well underway and Karma emailed pictures so we could share in their excitement.

Here, the first truckload bricks arrived on the site (following a ceremony to properly bless the ground before building).

 

The exterior of the building is coming along and windows are set.

 

By June that same year, the Himalayan Hope Home was complete.

Today, 14 orphan girls, ages 4 to 12, live there and every so often we receive a letter from one of them. Here is one—unedited and honest. It’s a reminder of just how vital a “home” truly is.

 

My name is Sonam Doka Sherpa. I am very happy to be a part of this very important project by The Small World for orphan girls in Nepal.  I am an orphan, I lost my mother and father at the age of 12..Being an orphan is not the way you want to live. Losing my mom and dad was just a small part of being an “orphan”. I felt the real pain of being an orphan when I have to live my life under a banner of being REJECTED, UNWANTED, and OPTIONAL. There was so much pain, fear and uncertainties in my life and no one to care, love and share those pains. These scars are still deep within me and every orphan child, and the pain didn’t go away when I turn 18.  The value and self-worth issues continue…for life.

Today because of some kind hearted people I have got opportunity to complete my education and because of my sponsor, their generosity, encouragement, prayers and love, I worked hard to live the right way and did not give my life up. I am living a normal life and engaged with many project related to women and children through The Small World. Education gave me this opportunity and today I am sharing my education to those who don’t have it. But every time I see kids without parents, I feel the pain of being in such situation. And it was my dream to be able to help as much orphan girls as I can in my life.

I have chosen to help others through the pain of the loss of their parents by sharing my story giving them hope and encouraging them to live the life in a right way. In Himalayan Hope Home I will be working as a mother and sister for all the orphans in there. It will be our first priority restore hope in a life of an orphan and then make sure that our girls have a secure future that every child deserves.

Thank you ARHAUS for helping to build this project, you are giving a future full of hope and opportunities to those who have unlimited pains in life. Orphans in Nepal face double tragedy they not only lost their parents but also live a very painful life as other treats them as a second class and everyone tries to take advantage of their situation.

 

The Small World is now part of our world—a partner, we support the organization’s outreach efforts, and the Himalayan Hope Home and the girls who live there. We take great pride in knowing that our donations provide something so simple, something that so many of us take for granted: shelter, education, emotional support…and a second chance at life, and a future.

Throughout the year, we promote giving campaigns for the organization in our store locations and we give as a company. Join us.

TAGS:  Giving campaigns, Himalayan Hope Home, John Reed, Nepal, The Small World,

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